The applicant did not do an analysis of the Greenville Fire District call volume by comparison. We pulled that data and crunched the numbers ourselves (Click here for the raw data). Below is a summary chart:

 Source: 2015 Greenville Fire District 911 Logs and the  projections from the Solana Houston Texas 2013, 2014 (strictly assisted living)  as a baseline (note: not  the Roseland facility which appears to be mixed use,  and accordingly isn't applicable). 

Source: 2015 Greenville Fire District 911 Logs and the projections from the Solana Houston Texas 2013, 2014 (strictly assisted living) as a baseline (note: not the Roseland facility which appears to be mixed use, and accordingly isn't applicable). 

In 2015, the number of calls that had to go down the S Curves on Underhill Road was 7. Four of those calls were to the Sprainbrook Nursery, and 3 were to locations outside the Fire District for mutual aid.

If the true projected number of calls is 125, than this represents a 17 fold increase in emergency traffic on those curves.

Moreover, in 2015, less than 25% of the single family homes were visited by the Greenville Fire District (there are less than 1800 single family homes in the district). Thus if the R-30 land was lawfully sold to a developer who created 4 single family homes, Greenville Fire would likely only visit once per year. This application represents a 12,500% increase over the proper use of that land.  

The question then becomes does the proposed safety mitigation of the guardrail and the tree cutting on that road reduce the risks by 17 fold or 12,500%? That's a stretch.

Even if the dangerous segment is a pre-existing condition, why pour gasoline on that fire by increasing the frequency with which our public safety professionals, volunteers, and oncoming traffic have to negotiate the dangerous situation?